By Published On: 16 September 2013385 words2 min read

speech bubble

This weekend, I moved in with my mother.

I was lucky enough to have some help. It made things easier, even though I still managed to leave some stuff at the old apartment after I’d turned in my keys.

On Saturday afternoon, after most of the heavy lifting was done and before my new bed arrived (storage comes at a premium in this place), we sat around the living room watching television. Suddenly, Flipper was on.

I went into a half thought out, half rambling explanation of why Flipper was a tragedy and what was happening in Japan each year and why Sea World were liars. I mentioned The Cove and Blackfish. My friend Steve is used to this; we’ve known each other for much longer than I’ve been vegan.

“It’s a tough thing,” he said. “Because you don’t want them to be killed, but…” I’ll be honest: I don’t remember what he said after the “but,” but it sounded like we only had two choices, and neither of them were ideal.

It’s kind of like the way we look at cows. “We have to milk them, or they’ll explode.” Or any farm animal, really. “We have to eat them, or they won’t exist/they’ll overrun the earth.”

I was too stressed and tired to make my case, and my mother came into the room soon after. “I used to watch this show all the time as a kid!” Steve agreed with her, and my opportunity was gone.

There are two things to remember in any situation where you are trying to speak on behalf of those who cannot:

  1. Speak your truth. Even if you are rambling and not-so-eloquent, the crux of your point will come across.
  2. Keep informed. Need to watch that clip or read that article again to get your facts straight? Do so.

The past couple of months have been a blur of personal problems and life changes and all sorts of things that have kept me out of the loop. I feel a bit off my game, and it’s time to brush up.

The amazing thing about veganism is that it’s there in every conversation and in every opportunity. Tomorrow will bring another chance to speak up. I hope you’ll take that chance with me.

Photo credit: Marc Wathieu via Flickr

By Published On: 16 September 2013385 words2 min read

speech bubble

This weekend, I moved in with my mother.

I was lucky enough to have some help. It made things easier, even though I still managed to leave some stuff at the old apartment after I’d turned in my keys.

On Saturday afternoon, after most of the heavy lifting was done and before my new bed arrived (storage comes at a premium in this place), we sat around the living room watching television. Suddenly, Flipper was on.

I went into a half thought out, half rambling explanation of why Flipper was a tragedy and what was happening in Japan each year and why Sea World were liars. I mentioned The Cove and Blackfish. My friend Steve is used to this; we’ve known each other for much longer than I’ve been vegan.

“It’s a tough thing,” he said. “Because you don’t want them to be killed, but…” I’ll be honest: I don’t remember what he said after the “but,” but it sounded like we only had two choices, and neither of them were ideal.

It’s kind of like the way we look at cows. “We have to milk them, or they’ll explode.” Or any farm animal, really. “We have to eat them, or they won’t exist/they’ll overrun the earth.”

I was too stressed and tired to make my case, and my mother came into the room soon after. “I used to watch this show all the time as a kid!” Steve agreed with her, and my opportunity was gone.

There are two things to remember in any situation where you are trying to speak on behalf of those who cannot:

  1. Speak your truth. Even if you are rambling and not-so-eloquent, the crux of your point will come across.
  2. Keep informed. Need to watch that clip or read that article again to get your facts straight? Do so.

The past couple of months have been a blur of personal problems and life changes and all sorts of things that have kept me out of the loop. I feel a bit off my game, and it’s time to brush up.

The amazing thing about veganism is that it’s there in every conversation and in every opportunity. Tomorrow will bring another chance to speak up. I hope you’ll take that chance with me.

Photo credit: Marc Wathieu via Flickr

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  1. Mary @ Mary's Test Kitchen December 17, 2013 at 12:56 pm - Reply

    I agree with speaking up! Know better, do better, right?

    That said, sometimes, I find it better to save the conversation for a later time when 1) I am more prepared, 2) I get a quiet moment with the other person.

    You said that you lost the opportunity. But really, you can create another opportunity. Just bring it up. ie. “Remember that time we were watching Flipper? It really stuck with me…here’s why”

    :-) At least, its what I do simple because I get flustered…which leads into me being emotional. lol

    • Daria Zeoli December 28, 2013 at 8:21 am - Reply

      @Mary – That’s a really great tip, to create another opportunity. Thanks for sharing! Hopefully, I’ll remember to put it into practice when I’m flustered in the moment!

  2. Crystal September 17, 2013 at 7:36 am - Reply

    I will always take that chance! I am right beside you (albeit in another state), Daria.