10 Ways to Help Animals this Summer

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10 Ways to Help Animals this Summer

By |June 13th, 2014|

Summer gives us space to think, feel, and act in a way that the other seasons deprive us of when we are over-booked and curled up in the cold after it gets dark during dinner. But it’s finally summer! And with it comes longer days and renewed energy… How can we use this to help animals and further causes we care about? Here are ten ways, and there are so many more:

1. Rescue, Foster, Transport or Walk Shelter Animals

Adopt Pitbulls

Photo credit: kathy doucette

Shelters and foster organizations are in dire need of help in a variety of ways. Fostering and adoption are two of the most obvious ways to help, but there’s so much more to do! Walk the dogs, play with the animals, clean cages, transport animals on their freedom rides to new homes and fosters, and ASK what you can do at your local shelter or sanctuary.

2. Visit Animal Sanctuaries

Rescue Pig

Photo credit: jonscottclark

Visit a farm sanctuary (or two or three). Take donations of food and supplies with you. Sanctuaries usually post a wish list on their web site, but it’s always okay to call or email to ask what to bring- here is a list to help get you started.  Oh, and take a journal. It’ll bring up some emotions and important insights.  Find an animal sanctuary near you.

3.  Vegan Potlucks

vegan potluck

Photo credit tofutti break

Join or host at least one vegan potluck. Getting together over food is good for the soul, and given what ethical vegans know and what we see when we volunteer to help abused animals, we NEED vegan potlucks. There are even virtual potlucks, if you aren’t able to get together with people.

4.  Armchair Activism

armchair

Photo credit: Enric Serra

Some people think “armchair” activism is a cop-out, that social media, emails and even mail is too weak to make a difference. But it’s never been easier to use your mouse (or your phone) to make an impact! Contact your congressperson about legislation, share important stories on Facebook and retweet statuses that may raise awareness to help animals.

5.  Read

read books

Photo credit: Peter Ras

Learn more about animals by reading.  You’ll be more effective at talking to others about a vegan lifestyle if you are up on vegan vibes. If your local library doesn’t have many vegan books, why not request them?  Here are a few suggestions:

6.  Donate

donate

Photo credit: Mindful One

If you can’t write a check, do what you can. Do you use Amazonsmile or GoodSearch when you shop? Is your grocery rewards card updated to automatically donate to an organization of your choice? Maybe your workplace matches your donation? Could you collect food donations for animals?  Get creative!

7.  Leaflet

vegan leaflet

Photo credit: mike.benedetti

If you’ve never tried leafleting, give it at least one shot! Many people go vegan (or stop going to Sea World or to the circus) after becoming educated. A local group will give you leaflets to use, or you can order them from Vegan Outreach.

8.  Audit your bathroom

leaping bunny

Photo courtesy of Leaping Bunny

Are your hygiene products cruelty-free? Which ones are? Ask the Leaping Bunny.

9.  Audit your closet

When you wear wool or leather, you may be conveying to others that such items are necessary to look good and be comfortable.  Donate them!

10.  Share

After you complete any or all of these items to help animals, comment here!  We want to hear about what you are thinking/feeling/observing as you do this vegan summer journey.  Inspire us and others!

Get even more ideas! Visit our How to Help Animals to help you get creative on behalf of the animals!

About the Author:

In addition to her deeply-held vegan values, Amy Bradley is vegan for the more practical reason that the vegan bakery is closest to her home. She has been vegan and an animal rights activist for 14 years and loves to adopt and foster companion animals. The furry members of her household outnumber the humans, so the dogs take over the couch while she, her husband and son pet them from their place on the floor. Amy taught high school for ten years and works in education. Her students informed her that she not only wears her veganism on her sleeve (literally) but shouts it from a megaphone (occasionally).

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