By Published On: 9 April 2013270 words1.4 min read

news49

Special Edition: Wildlife and Poaching in Africa

The task ahead is pretty critical for the elephant. “Barely a month ago, 10 poachers walked into Tsavo East National Park and killed 12 elephants, including a two-month-old calf. They pulled out the tusks and disappeared to elephants-don’t-know-where. Only one suspect has since been apprehended. This is not the first time this is happening. Elephants are under threat. They are paying an undue and violent price for possessing tusks. But, more directly, poachers are doing the continent and Kenya the worst form of disservice. The facts and statistics are as revolting as the inaction of several governments….”

Kenya steps up anti-poaching operations. “The government has stepped up anti-poaching operations with a view to stamping out the poaching menace noting that the country has already lost 74 elephants since the year begun. Through a statement sent to newsrooms, Government spokesman Muthui Kariuki said Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) would deploy 1000 more rangers to beef up wildlife security efforts.”

Wildlife Managers Are Poisoning Rhino Horns to Stop People From Eating Them. “The poison, a mix of parasiticides and pink dye, now fills more than 100 rhinos’ horns, which were not harmed in the process. Anyone who eats horns laced with the poison will become ill, with symptoms including nausea, stomach ache and diarrhea  though they will not die, managers say. Conservationists hope the poison—which is easily seen thanks to the pink dye—make consumers think twice before eating the purported ‘medicinal product.’ Airport scanners can also detect the dye, whether it’s contained within a whole horn or ground into a powder.”

Photo credit: nicolasnova via Flickr

By Published On: 9 April 2013270 words1.4 min read

news49

Special Edition: Wildlife and Poaching in Africa

The task ahead is pretty critical for the elephant. “Barely a month ago, 10 poachers walked into Tsavo East National Park and killed 12 elephants, including a two-month-old calf. They pulled out the tusks and disappeared to elephants-don’t-know-where. Only one suspect has since been apprehended. This is not the first time this is happening. Elephants are under threat. They are paying an undue and violent price for possessing tusks. But, more directly, poachers are doing the continent and Kenya the worst form of disservice. The facts and statistics are as revolting as the inaction of several governments….”

Kenya steps up anti-poaching operations. “The government has stepped up anti-poaching operations with a view to stamping out the poaching menace noting that the country has already lost 74 elephants since the year begun. Through a statement sent to newsrooms, Government spokesman Muthui Kariuki said Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) would deploy 1000 more rangers to beef up wildlife security efforts.”

Wildlife Managers Are Poisoning Rhino Horns to Stop People From Eating Them. “The poison, a mix of parasiticides and pink dye, now fills more than 100 rhinos’ horns, which were not harmed in the process. Anyone who eats horns laced with the poison will become ill, with symptoms including nausea, stomach ache and diarrhea  though they will not die, managers say. Conservationists hope the poison—which is easily seen thanks to the pink dye—make consumers think twice before eating the purported ‘medicinal product.’ Airport scanners can also detect the dye, whether it’s contained within a whole horn or ground into a powder.”

Photo credit: nicolasnova via Flickr

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