By Published On: 13 July 2013531 words2.7 min read

Freedom Hen

Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary operates outside of the Salt Lake City area of Utah, in a town named Riverton. It was founded in 1998 by Faith and Mike Ching, and is a certified non-profit organization which can take tax deductible donations. They state on their website that they “believe that our advocate work can help change perceptions of farm animals and create a deeper respect for the rich emotional lives of these animals.”

The sanctuary has recently acquired twenty five hens, all who came from an egg factory farm in California. At this factory farm, they endured small battery cages, where they were unable to spread their wings, walk or forage for food, enjoy dirt baths or any other activities naturally enjoyed by a hen. Because these conditions terrify the hens so easily, it is standard industry practice for the farm to cut off the tips of the hen’s beaks (this method, called “debeaking,” is performed with a hot blade and no anesthesia, resulting in pain both during and long after the procedure) so that the hens will not peck at one another. All twenty five hens were subjected to this process.

However, the twenty five little ladies are now safe at Ching Sanctuary, where they have been given the name the “Freedom Hens.” According to the sanctuary, after just a few days of being given refuge, they are enjoying their freedom by freely dust bathing, perching, standing in their water dishes to keep cool, preening, and other natural hen activities.

Ching Sanctuary is currently looking for donations to help support these new residents, who are ambassadors that represent the freedom that all other hens trapped in factory farms deserve. The sanctuary’s goal is to find a sponsor for each hen, with an option of donating $20 a month for one year, or $180 for an entire year upfront. If you sponsor a hen, you also have the option to give that hen a name of your choice. The first lucky hen to be sponsored has been named Hannah, after a beloved dog that passed away. Please consider sponsoring a hen so that the sanctuary can give them a new, fresh start at a safe home.

Ching Sanctuary gives home to countless animals, from farm animals to rabbits, to cats to dogs. If you live nearby, consider volunteering, or buying them supplies from their wishlist. The best help you can give is to sponsor, as like all sanctuaries, they rely solely on donor contributions.

Helping the “Freedom Hens” is a great way to get involved, as these twenty five hens represent one of the industry’s worst practices. The hens are fortunate to find a new, safe, loving home at Ching Sanctuary, and they remind us of the countless hens that endure and succumb to a system that doesn’t recognize them as unique individuals. By giving them a home, a new life, and a name, we reinforce that hens do more than lay eggs; they like to dust bathe, they like to chat amongst themselves, they like to preen and eat, and they like to walk free with enough open space to stretch their wings wide open.

Photo credit: Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary

By Published On: 13 July 2013531 words2.7 min read

Freedom Hen

Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary operates outside of the Salt Lake City area of Utah, in a town named Riverton. It was founded in 1998 by Faith and Mike Ching, and is a certified non-profit organization which can take tax deductible donations. They state on their website that they “believe that our advocate work can help change perceptions of farm animals and create a deeper respect for the rich emotional lives of these animals.”

The sanctuary has recently acquired twenty five hens, all who came from an egg factory farm in California. At this factory farm, they endured small battery cages, where they were unable to spread their wings, walk or forage for food, enjoy dirt baths or any other activities naturally enjoyed by a hen. Because these conditions terrify the hens so easily, it is standard industry practice for the farm to cut off the tips of the hen’s beaks (this method, called “debeaking,” is performed with a hot blade and no anesthesia, resulting in pain both during and long after the procedure) so that the hens will not peck at one another. All twenty five hens were subjected to this process.

However, the twenty five little ladies are now safe at Ching Sanctuary, where they have been given the name the “Freedom Hens.” According to the sanctuary, after just a few days of being given refuge, they are enjoying their freedom by freely dust bathing, perching, standing in their water dishes to keep cool, preening, and other natural hen activities.

Ching Sanctuary is currently looking for donations to help support these new residents, who are ambassadors that represent the freedom that all other hens trapped in factory farms deserve. The sanctuary’s goal is to find a sponsor for each hen, with an option of donating $20 a month for one year, or $180 for an entire year upfront. If you sponsor a hen, you also have the option to give that hen a name of your choice. The first lucky hen to be sponsored has been named Hannah, after a beloved dog that passed away. Please consider sponsoring a hen so that the sanctuary can give them a new, fresh start at a safe home.

Ching Sanctuary gives home to countless animals, from farm animals to rabbits, to cats to dogs. If you live nearby, consider volunteering, or buying them supplies from their wishlist. The best help you can give is to sponsor, as like all sanctuaries, they rely solely on donor contributions.

Helping the “Freedom Hens” is a great way to get involved, as these twenty five hens represent one of the industry’s worst practices. The hens are fortunate to find a new, safe, loving home at Ching Sanctuary, and they remind us of the countless hens that endure and succumb to a system that doesn’t recognize them as unique individuals. By giving them a home, a new life, and a name, we reinforce that hens do more than lay eggs; they like to dust bathe, they like to chat amongst themselves, they like to preen and eat, and they like to walk free with enough open space to stretch their wings wide open.

Photo credit: Ching Farm Rescue & Sanctuary

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