By Published On: 18 July 2013503 words2.6 min read

FarmConference

Do you often find yourself moved by the work of farm animal sanctuary owners, or catch yourself dreaming of helping as many neglected animals as possible? If you’re deeply interested in sanctuaries, and what it takes to operate one, then you may want to check out the Farm Animal Care Conference, an event hosted by Farm Sanctuary in Watkins Glen, New York. This year the conference will take place over the weekend of September 14 and 15 with a packed schedule of workshops that are meant to help give you the tools you need to take your interest to the next level.

The conference offers attendees a concentrated look into the skills needed to start and operate a sanctuary. The entire conference schedule is available here. Saturday’s events include two one-hour long presentations by one of the shelter’s directors, Nikki Bollaert, on shelter administration and fundraising, followed by a question and answer session. The latter part of Saturday begins a string of sessions, run by Susie Cotton and Tara Oresick, which focuses directly on the animals. An hour is dedicated to each species, from chickens to turkeys to pigs to rabbits. Sunday, Michelle Waffner, who has been involved with Farm Sanctuary for over ten years, will talk about shelter care operations and programs, and shelter education. The afternoon will again dedicate itself to sessions on specific animals, like cattle, sheep, goats, ducks and geese. The final session will be on shelter farm equipment and cleaning.

Light breakfast will be served in the morning, and a lunch will be provided on both days. Attendees are welcome to find lodging nearby, or camp on the sanctuary grounds starting the Friday night before. You can spend all day learning about the animals, and then go to sleep at night knowing you are only a few steps away from them. It sounds like an intimate atmosphere for learning, especially if you have an interest in starting a sanctuary, but don’t know where to start. These introductory sessions are also useful for those who may not want to start a sanctuary, but do want to be involved in the dialogue, or as an entry to other kinds of sanctuary jobs. It’s always useful to know about non-profits, and to know generally about animal care.

Registration for the Farm Animal Care Conference is $150. According to the Farm Animal Care Conference page, registration has sold out. However, you can request to be put on the waiting list by e-mailing Mary Ellen Murray at [email protected] or calling 607-583-2225 ext. 240. Should you miss your chance this year, you can certainly plan to attend one of these wonderful conferences in the future. But meanwhile, until you get a chance to get hands on training with the animals, you can find out if there is a local sanctuary near you which needs volunteers. Volunteering can help you begin the process of getting to know sanctuaries, and it can lead to experiences that push you to expand what it is you know about animals.

By Published On: 18 July 2013503 words2.6 min read

FarmConference

Do you often find yourself moved by the work of farm animal sanctuary owners, or catch yourself dreaming of helping as many neglected animals as possible? If you’re deeply interested in sanctuaries, and what it takes to operate one, then you may want to check out the Farm Animal Care Conference, an event hosted by Farm Sanctuary in Watkins Glen, New York. This year the conference will take place over the weekend of September 14 and 15 with a packed schedule of workshops that are meant to help give you the tools you need to take your interest to the next level.

The conference offers attendees a concentrated look into the skills needed to start and operate a sanctuary. The entire conference schedule is available here. Saturday’s events include two one-hour long presentations by one of the shelter’s directors, Nikki Bollaert, on shelter administration and fundraising, followed by a question and answer session. The latter part of Saturday begins a string of sessions, run by Susie Cotton and Tara Oresick, which focuses directly on the animals. An hour is dedicated to each species, from chickens to turkeys to pigs to rabbits. Sunday, Michelle Waffner, who has been involved with Farm Sanctuary for over ten years, will talk about shelter care operations and programs, and shelter education. The afternoon will again dedicate itself to sessions on specific animals, like cattle, sheep, goats, ducks and geese. The final session will be on shelter farm equipment and cleaning.

Light breakfast will be served in the morning, and a lunch will be provided on both days. Attendees are welcome to find lodging nearby, or camp on the sanctuary grounds starting the Friday night before. You can spend all day learning about the animals, and then go to sleep at night knowing you are only a few steps away from them. It sounds like an intimate atmosphere for learning, especially if you have an interest in starting a sanctuary, but don’t know where to start. These introductory sessions are also useful for those who may not want to start a sanctuary, but do want to be involved in the dialogue, or as an entry to other kinds of sanctuary jobs. It’s always useful to know about non-profits, and to know generally about animal care.

Registration for the Farm Animal Care Conference is $150. According to the Farm Animal Care Conference page, registration has sold out. However, you can request to be put on the waiting list by e-mailing Mary Ellen Murray at [email protected] or calling 607-583-2225 ext. 240. Should you miss your chance this year, you can certainly plan to attend one of these wonderful conferences in the future. But meanwhile, until you get a chance to get hands on training with the animals, you can find out if there is a local sanctuary near you which needs volunteers. Volunteering can help you begin the process of getting to know sanctuaries, and it can lead to experiences that push you to expand what it is you know about animals.

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