By Published On: 3 February 2011603 words3.1 min read

A vegan is a vegan is a vegan….right?  Well, not exactly.  See, there are people who eat vegan and then there are people who are vegan.  Don’t get your hackles up, I’m not about to start bashing people.  What I’m talking about is all the recent scuttlebutt regarding vegans fighting with each other over what a vegan is, or isn’t.

I, for one, am happy to see it addressed on so many vegan blogs.  I think it’s long past time to address certain issues in the community, and long past time to organize ourselves as a real movement that can affect change.  We are not organized, we are not unified, we are not consistent with our message- and it’s holding the vegan movement back.  While the vegans are fighting with each other over whether or not a bee is an animal, billions of non-humans are force bred, force fed, and then forced to be dead.  We cannot inspire change if we cannot change ourselves.

And we cannot affect change if we can’t even agree on what veganism is.

Being vegan means that you reject the use of animals, and that extends into every aspect of your life.  When you make excuses on why you can’t be vegan, yes- I said it, excuses- when you make excuses on why you can’t give up animal products, you prove to anyone who knows you that veganism is too hard.  And that is simply not true.

One of the biggest controversies in the vegan world is over honey.  Is it really that hard to avoid honey?  No.  It is inconvenient as hell to try and avoid, I’ll say that.  They put honey in everything from food to face creams.  That fact alone should stop any “I’m vegan but still eat honey” people in their tracks.  If an animal product is mass produced, it can’t be ethical.  Meaning, if you manipulate the breeding habits and environment for personal use (whether you are the beekeeper or not it would still be personal use) then it is exploitation.  Bees are insects, insects are animals, and vegans are not speciesist.

Honey is not vegan

Mass Produced “Natural” Honey can never be vegan

If you set aside your morals and ethics, other people will, too.  What is the vegan message you’re sending?

Don’t get me wrong, being vegan doesn’t mean that you are perfect.  But it does mean living compassionately and you shouldn’t apologize for it, just as you wouldn’t expect someone to apologize for refusing cake when they are dieting.  Even if it means that you refuse food that insert someone you know or love here made you.  My grandmother can’t fathom why I don’t eat her famous homemade strudel at Christmas time; I used to exclusively eat that for Christmas dinner when I was a child.  But my grandmother loves me, she doesn’t hinge our relationship on the food I eat, and I doubt that insert someone you know or love here would either.  If you are important to them, they will understand.

One more thing, it’s okay to ask someone to go vegan.  It doesn’t make you preachy, it doesn’t make you radical- sharing your veganism with someone is nothing more than a testimonial about something you feel strongly about.  Don’t feel afraid of your convictions, you have the power to change the world.  One email, one conversation, one tweet at a time.

What will you do with your vegan power?

Put down your forks, quit apologizing, and stay vegan.

A no uttered from the deepest conviction is better than a yes merely uttered to please, or worse, to avoid trouble. ~ Gandhi

By Published On: 3 February 2011603 words3.1 min read

A vegan is a vegan is a vegan….right?  Well, not exactly.  See, there are people who eat vegan and then there are people who are vegan.  Don’t get your hackles up, I’m not about to start bashing people.  What I’m talking about is all the recent scuttlebutt regarding vegans fighting with each other over what a vegan is, or isn’t.

I, for one, am happy to see it addressed on so many vegan blogs.  I think it’s long past time to address certain issues in the community, and long past time to organize ourselves as a real movement that can affect change.  We are not organized, we are not unified, we are not consistent with our message- and it’s holding the vegan movement back.  While the vegans are fighting with each other over whether or not a bee is an animal, billions of non-humans are force bred, force fed, and then forced to be dead.  We cannot inspire change if we cannot change ourselves.

And we cannot affect change if we can’t even agree on what veganism is.

Being vegan means that you reject the use of animals, and that extends into every aspect of your life.  When you make excuses on why you can’t be vegan, yes- I said it, excuses- when you make excuses on why you can’t give up animal products, you prove to anyone who knows you that veganism is too hard.  And that is simply not true.

One of the biggest controversies in the vegan world is over honey.  Is it really that hard to avoid honey?  No.  It is inconvenient as hell to try and avoid, I’ll say that.  They put honey in everything from food to face creams.  That fact alone should stop any “I’m vegan but still eat honey” people in their tracks.  If an animal product is mass produced, it can’t be ethical.  Meaning, if you manipulate the breeding habits and environment for personal use (whether you are the beekeeper or not it would still be personal use) then it is exploitation.  Bees are insects, insects are animals, and vegans are not speciesist.

Honey is not vegan

Mass Produced “Natural” Honey can never be vegan

If you set aside your morals and ethics, other people will, too.  What is the vegan message you’re sending?

Don’t get me wrong, being vegan doesn’t mean that you are perfect.  But it does mean living compassionately and you shouldn’t apologize for it, just as you wouldn’t expect someone to apologize for refusing cake when they are dieting.  Even if it means that you refuse food that insert someone you know or love here made you.  My grandmother can’t fathom why I don’t eat her famous homemade strudel at Christmas time; I used to exclusively eat that for Christmas dinner when I was a child.  But my grandmother loves me, she doesn’t hinge our relationship on the food I eat, and I doubt that insert someone you know or love here would either.  If you are important to them, they will understand.

One more thing, it’s okay to ask someone to go vegan.  It doesn’t make you preachy, it doesn’t make you radical- sharing your veganism with someone is nothing more than a testimonial about something you feel strongly about.  Don’t feel afraid of your convictions, you have the power to change the world.  One email, one conversation, one tweet at a time.

What will you do with your vegan power?

Put down your forks, quit apologizing, and stay vegan.

A no uttered from the deepest conviction is better than a yes merely uttered to please, or worse, to avoid trouble. ~ Gandhi

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  1. MS May 13, 2018 at 11:34 am - Reply

    Laptops and most phones are not vegan so you wrote the article with a non vegan product.Vegan are speciests and it is ok like the insects in some foods like chocolate and any packaged food that is organic and plant based.

  2. Dave Astray June 13, 2015 at 6:34 am - Reply

    Any use….Arguing for rights that we cannot provide, hypocritically riling against the use of animals while a mutilated conditioned companion animal is locked up in there home…. Veganism needs to work on being inclusive not exclusive, nobody knows what is practical for another so stop trying to enforce your views of practicality onto others while you quite impractically use animals for your own personal pleasure.

  3. vegangsterARNP March 1, 2013 at 12:46 am - Reply

    Great post. Thank you.

    Just a couple comments to the commenters:

    Cheryl’s comment: how about we be consistent across the board about zero tolerance for any use of others? When humans try to pick and choose which issue is most important, we are again, using the human filter to decide life or death. I am unsure how know honey bees are of less importance than cows and pigs in factory farms, and why we should tackle that first?

    John’s comment: John says he is vegan and he eats honey and he doesn’t care if you or anyone else thinks he is vegan. Ding ding ding!!!! that lie detector test would be ringing. If he didn’t care, he wouldn’t need to confess his “sin” on this post.

    Gary’s comment: Veganism is not like religion. It is merely the intent to do as little harm as possible to the non humans. Vegans hate the massacre taking place every single second, therefore they feel the need to reveal this hidden fact to others. That is fact, NOT fiction.Religion is based on faith of something or someone’s existence that you can’t see, but veganism is ACTION which is in direct response to things you can.

  4. Hillary September 7, 2011 at 5:09 pm - Reply

    I know that this is an older post, but what are your thoughts about someone whose mandated work uniform (firefighter) contains leather? Can they still consider themselves to be vegan?

  5. Cheryl July 14, 2011 at 9:13 pm - Reply

    As soon as things get preachy I start feeling like throwing a steak on the barbecue. For the last few years I’ve chosen not to eat animal products – which is a bit of a blanket statement referring mostly to meat, fish, poultry, milk, eggs… For the sake of short-hand I refer to myself as eating a vegan diet. I’m pretty conscious about where the leather in shoes or the gelatine in marshmallows comes from – but I haven’t run away from them in horror, imagining a field of blood in which every evil leather wearing marshmallow eating killer out there must be shown the true vegan path.

    I am so sick of getting the hint that this just isn’t good enough. Isn’t even one less person eating one less hamburger a pretty good thing? I’m frigging positive that we’d all convince more people to try eating less meat… to just consider for a minute where that chicken breast came from… by simply modelling a more ethical, thoughtful behaviour – instead of throwing up even more “us versus them” barriers by whining about how the poor exploited honey bee is getting the shaft. Come on… how about this? First we end factory farming: which is a truly heinous form of systemic cruelty, and then we can pick on the thoughtless murderers that don’t check if the sugar in their coffee was filtered through bone char. If every person going through a fast food drive-through right now demanded just one delicious vegan burger, even on day a week instead… the sugar industry would probably run out of bones to char.

  6. Eric June 7, 2011 at 8:39 am - Reply

    KD, looking at your comments, is it any wonder there is no unity? There are those who call themselves vegan and (bizarrely) see some animal use as okay, and those who don’t. Those in the former camp can have their ‘mainstream’ “vegan world/not a vegan club” nonsense. The rest of us should indeed unify around the belief that all animal use is wrong and that veganism means doing our very best to avoid it at all times. It really isn’t that hard (I’ve been vegan over 9 years and have never found it hard to avoid honey, for example). Frankly, I’m getting tired of so-called vegans who make it seem like veganism *is* difficult. *That* holds back ‘the movement’.

  7. Wendy May 25, 2011 at 3:52 am - Reply

    Is it true that vegans can’t eat any sugar because an animal product is used in it production?

    • KD May 25, 2011 at 7:23 am - Reply

      Hi Wendy! No, it’s not true that vegans can’t eat any sugar. Most sugar is processed with bone char thus making it not vegan. Some sugar, beet sugar and organic sugars, are not processed with bone char and therefore okay to eat. Here is some additional information for you -> https://www.yourdailyvegan.com/2009/11/16/say-no-to-bone-char/

  8. Ken March 29, 2011 at 11:03 am - Reply

    I read with interest some of the debate thus far.

    Vegan Outreach literature addresses many of the issues raised:
    http://www.veganoutreach.org/advocacy/path.html

    Matt Ball et al recommend that we explain to individuals like Ward (who sounds like a typical defensive carnist, btw) that what truly matters is actively reducing animal suffering through practical and possible means, which VARY. There is no simple cut-and-dry answer, one actually has to use their brain.

    For example, I indeed purchased a laptop potentially containing animal byproducts; however, I use it to communicate veganism. By doing so I’ve influenced multiple people to go vegetarian/vegan, and made countless others aware of some of the issues, thus reducing animal suffering exponentially more than had I not purchased this laptop.

    See how that works?

    Much of the below was totally missing the bullshit-cutting power of a VO/utilitarian approach.

    Cheers!

  9. Amy March 23, 2011 at 6:07 pm - Reply

    It’s exactly posts like this that make me not want to call myself a vegan and align myself with your movement even though I eat no animal products. seriously there is an animal product of some kind in nearly everything! stop squaking and ostrasizing people with your holier than thou act and do something productive. meh.

    • KD March 23, 2011 at 9:41 pm - Reply

      Amy: I appreciate you taking the time to comment, though I’m not sure exactly what it was that I said that you have an aversion to. I’ve already addressed the “of course we can’t attain perfection,” further, I didn’t ostracize anyone- rather I said we need to unify (and, of course, define veganism and remain consistent about it). It’s not holier than thou, it’s a desire to create a stronger, louder, more influential vegan community.

      Isn’t that something we all could benefit from?

  10. Gary March 12, 2011 at 1:29 pm - Reply

    Veganism is a lot like religion. There are some who are more orthodox than others. I think the important thing is that we all continue striving towards the ideal.

  11. john February 11, 2011 at 2:39 pm - Reply

    I’m vegan, have been for a very long time, and I eat honey occasionally, and I don’t really care if you or anyone else thinks that means I’m not really vegan.

  12. Ward February 9, 2011 at 6:33 pm - Reply

    That’s interesting you raised the idea of Vegan shoes. Being the curious sort that I am I expect to find a stylish blend of wooden soles and hemp/cotton uppers. Sadly I was disappointed when I visited Mooshoes and read their faq. What I found was polyurethane micro fiber, rubber soles and various other polymer based clothes. I saw some cork soles that clearly are animal friendly but they often were attached to things that most definitely were not.

    So vegan shoes aren’t vegan (although some governing body of all things vegan wants us to think so) Polyurethane Microfiber and the like are the most amazing blend of big oil and dead cows. So while it might look like fake leather it isn’t really. It’s still made with dead cow. So are the soles on all those shoes NOT made with cork or some other fibrous plant like wood.

    So my take away from this seems to be, KD, and I’m genuinely trying not to be disrespectful. That the vegan movement is about food and fashion. That appearance is more important than substance (if it doesn’t look like dead cow you can wear it or use it even if it is dead cow). Otherwise why wouldn’t you do what it takes to be truly vegan? Get rid of all the plastics and rubbers in your life (those big oil synthetics aren’t any better for the environment than the gas in your car so it’s good for all of us but that’s another debate). To be truly Vegan shouldn’t you be willing to give up the things that change your standard of living as well as your fashion and food choices? If not then one has to start questioning if it’s morally correct to waste so much of that dead cow simply to get a cow based synthetic shoe. (assuming for argument sake we’ve all given up eating cows and dealing in a Utopian society where meat eaters aren’t killing them anyway.) To say they are dieing anyway so it’s ok to still use parts of them really is just a denial of culpability isn’t it?

  13. Ward February 9, 2011 at 12:50 pm - Reply

    KD
    I think almost anyone can respect that. All too often, however, veganism and how it is presented is not a simple and humble statement of belief to be rejected or embraced by the person listening. It is a sword wielded with moral certainty by those who champion it. Convert or be put to that metaphorical sword.

    In your original blog I interpeted the honey example as “avoid it in all things. It is not easy to avoid it but it is possible therefore you should”.

    This statement you made “There is a difference between choosing to use a computer or drive a car (for instance) than rejecting the use of animals in our foods, clothing, beauty products, household goods, and more.”

    Explain the difference? If the components that make the computer or the car or the thousands of other life improving products that would qualify as your “and more” all require animal products to make why wouldn’t a committed vegan do it? Why wouldn’t you wear wooden soled shoes, walk everywhere, abandon all plastics including your computer? There are billions in the world that survive without any of those things? What is the moral difference between using cosmetics with honey versus a computer with rendered cow parts?

    • KD February 9, 2011 at 1:19 pm - Reply

      Ward, I’m not sure who you’re referring to when you talk about folks wielding this “metaphorical sword of veganism.” Sure, there are people who are vegan zealots – but there are folks who are like that regardless of what their cause is (take religion, for example). Don’t let the few tarnish the rest of us, please. There is room for intelligent discourse on the subject without being reduced to a stereotype. And quite honestly, I’ve heard more belligerent & defensive carnivores than vegan people hands down.

      You seem to be stuck on this perfection thing, listen- I get your point. No one is completely vegan. I’m not disputing that. But that fact alone is precisely why I’m vegan. Animal use (including by-products) is institutionalized in modern society- I live in modern society. I am working to change hearts and minds about this institutionalism- and the place to start is with the billions of animals raised and slaughtered each year for our products- that includes honey. Is there a difference between a cow dying for my plate or my computer? No. But people will continue to use animals (creating even more exploitative uses so that it’s more “cost effective”) until people stand up and say, “that’s enough- we reject the use of these animals.” It’s a sad fact that companies will produce what the consumer wants. If we demand animal free computers then, eventually, we’ll get them. Basic supply and demand. Everyone has the power to affect change in a positive way- giving up because you can’t be perfect won’t help anyone or any animal.

      PS. I own vegan shoes. Several pairs as a matter of fact. And if I wanted to use cosmetics, I could find vegan ones too. It’s possible. :)

  14. Ward February 9, 2011 at 10:57 am - Reply

    Having said that Charleen, vegans should also temper their approach with the full awareness that even they have not fully adopted a vegan lifestyle. True vegans, those that fully and completely reject ANYTHINg containing animal products are almost impossible to find. Even you have not done it even though your belief in the “cause” may be strong.

    I think that where pushback comes from is that almost every vegan I have ever met, that wasn’t simply following it as part of Buddhism, has always approached it from a social justice Jihad mentality. An “in your face” social activism approach.

    • KD February 9, 2011 at 12:35 pm - Reply

      Ward, You are implying that if you cannot obtain perfection that you shouldn’t even try to eliminate as many animal products (and their by-products) from your life. That is simply silly. There is a difference between choosing to use a computer or drive a car (for instance) than rejecting the use of animals in our foods, clothing, beauty products, household goods, and more. No one here is suggesting to be “in your face” about activism- rather empowering people to be themselves and not be afraid of what other people think of them. It’s not radical, it’s not a “Jihad mentality” – it’s conviction, compassion, and respect. If for some reason someone didn’t want to discuss veganism with me, I wouldn’t push it because I’m respectful. But I’m also not going to remain silent and miss my opportunity to inspire someone. It can be done in a respectful manner, somehow you seem to be missing that point.

  15. Charleen February 8, 2011 at 10:03 pm - Reply

    Snowflake- “…freedom from the information being put forth against their will.” Really?? Who exactly is forcing you to listen? You or anyone is no more forced to listen than a vegan is forced to be silent.
    It’s evident you don’t agree with vegan philosophy, but your response shouldn’t be to tell people to basically “shut up.”. It only serves to invalidate the rest of your argument.

  16. Snowflake February 8, 2011 at 9:08 pm - Reply

    Discussing Veganism and it’s implications with individuals that choose not to live the vegan way of life are entitled to freedom from the information being put forth against their will. I find it offensive being told that a meat-free society is ideal, when there are so many people starving and don’t have the option to be fussy.

    Showcasing the maltreatment of animals raises awareness to an important issue, but like I said, if someone isn’t interested it should not be forced.

    Veganism generally presents itself in a radical fashion, that everyone should follow the vegan path. However, the free will of each individual allows for autonomy in the decision of what he or she wears/eats/uses as tools. There are individuals that live off land animals and hunt it themselves. They wear the fur to prevent frostbite in freezing temperatures. Parts of the animal’s body is used to make tools, garments, and shelter. Should these people convert to veganism, although it is not their cultural and ethnic norm?

    I think educating individuals on the health implications of eating processed food and the benefits of more plant-based foods is important, especially for the role of physicians and clinicians. I also think that the personal choice should be made in regards to ethical living and diet, without the constant influence and comment of a certain population.

  17. Charleen February 8, 2011 at 8:00 pm - Reply

    Rd, don’t confuse standing firm on one’s convictions with prosyletizing. If no one ever stood up for what they believed in, we’d still be owning slaves. Should we as the human race just keep our mouths shut? Or do you think the human race has reached the pinnacle of their civilization? This is a moral issue which demands discussion, not silence. The fact that you don’t realize this confirms that assertion.

  18. RD February 8, 2011 at 7:46 pm - Reply

    I don’t think it is ever okay to ask someone to go vegan, unless a clear interest is expressed. It is preachy, it is radical, and it is terribly rude.

    It’s the equivalent of asking someone to become Christian or to denounce their faith. It can be very unwanted and is disrespectful.

    Don’t go around expressing your “convictions” in a forceful manner or to those that are not interested in Veganism. It’s highly offensive to push your beliefs on another person, no matter how strongly you feel about it.

    • KD February 8, 2011 at 8:02 pm - Reply

      RD- I didn’t encourage anyone to “forceful(ly) talk to those that are not interested in veganism,” rather I said it was okay to be our authentic selves. Too often people keep what’s important to them to themselves instead of sharing their stories. People are able to learn and grow from sharing stories about life’s experiences, so why would sharing your veganism (if you are vegan, it’s a large part of your life) be disrespectful? You mistook what I wrote as something negative when in actuality, it is full of empowerment. I want to empower the vegans to tell our stories and talk about what is happening to these animals. Instead of looking at it like it’s “preachy” – look at it more like, people (vegans) talking to other people (non-vegans) about something that they are passionate about- it’s something that they love. You never know what will inspire someone, so why not allow the beauty of veganism be the inspiration?

    • James Parker May 18, 2015 at 1:04 pm - Reply

      But people who arent vegan are forcing their beliefs on innocent creatures. They totally agree with it, otherwise they’re hypocrites.

  19. Ward February 6, 2011 at 7:49 pm - Reply

    So let me make saure i’m following along with your logic. You don’t eat meat because you don’t like that an animal is killed to feed you. You don’t wear fur because you don’t like that an animal has clothed you. But you like computers. Better than cows so you’ll use one of those and kill a cow as long as no one sees you eating meat or wearinmg fur. So your only an “obvious” vegan? I’ll ony do the “obnvious” things so it looks like i’m rejecting? Again what’s the rational difference between why you won’t wear the skin of the cow but you gobble up the products that use the rest of him? You certainly have the ability to chose not to. Humanity survived for eons without rubber and plastic.

  20. Charleen February 6, 2011 at 7:22 pm - Reply

    Ward, thank you again for exemplifying the institutionalized use of animals in modern industry. This is why your computer model is absurd compared to honey. You have a direct influence when purchasing an ANIMAL product such as honey where, yes, bees die as a DIRECT result (your continued denial of this fact is frustrating). Society has a responsibility in eliminating stearic acid in the production if polymers. Stearic acid is also derived from plants and plant production wastes. This alternative is often ignored due to simple economics- animal derived stearic acid is cheap and plentiful (as with all animal products). It’s about greed over morals and people’s unwillingness (laziness?) to change. Being vegan isn’t about ignoring realities- it’s about changing them.

  21. Ward February 5, 2011 at 5:15 pm - Reply

    The honeybee plight would be unintentional although I fail to see why honey bee managers would manipulate the environment in an ecologically devestating way. Since honey bees need green space and flowers to function the seems counterintuitive at best. Other human factors certainly are a problem to the ecology but I concede I’ve spent no time researching how bee keepers are ruining the ecology so I have to take your word for it.

    My computer example is one I am clearly not articulating well or you wouldn’t see it as absurd. So let me try and reframe it.

    The plastics in things like computers, ruber in shoes and tires and these sorts of things require, as part of their list of raw materials, stearic acid that is a biproduct of slaughtering animals. By using any of the products that require stearic acid, such as that computer you are using, you are direrctly and intentionally ending an animal’s life. What is the rational difference between using an animals stearic acid versus it’s fur?

    If the vegan eutopia ever occured and none of us ate meat again how would you select which animals will die so you can continue to make rubber and plastic and all of these so call synthetic products tat require it.

    Since you like using computers and it isn’t a necessity of life is it really fair to criticize vegans who use honey. After all honey does not require the intentional death of a bee whereas the plastic in your computer certainly requires the intentional death of an animal to make it ?

    So is anyone actually a vegan? If everyone stops eating meat those millions of cows will still have to be killed to make all those plastic and rubber things we use everyday. So if you will contribute to the same number of cows and pigs dieing every year regarless of what you eat can you fairly crtitcise someone who chooses a little differently than you? From my vantage point I would say that someone living the life of a luddite eating honey would have the moral high ground over you and your cow killing plastic.

  22. Charleen February 5, 2011 at 4:28 pm - Reply

    Ward,
    Honey production does cause the death of bees, as well as other animals through habitat and environmental manipulation/destruction. This is well documented in science journals and is easily searchable on the Internet.
    Comparing this to computer production is absurd. It is a fact that industrialization has altered in a negative way, our natural environment. Thank you for pointing out the institutionalization of animal exploitation- and for that matter, blatant disregard of nature- in our society. This only reinforces the importance of eliminating animal use and other forms of destructive behaviour that’s lowering the quality of life on Earth and killing us all.

  23. Ward February 5, 2011 at 2:16 pm - Reply

    I wasn’t refering to the animals inadvertantly killed in the fields during harvest. That’s the standard denial defense. The “we don’t mean it” defense. I’m referring to the millions that are specifically targeted and killed while the grains are stored to be shipped or processed into vegan food.

    The bigger question I have is more related to the honey point your raised. You were critical of the people who chose to use products that contained honey because it violates the bees rights. Your position seems to be that they aren’t necessary so should be avoided. Yet the computer you choose to use requires the destruction of a life for the products in it. A far graver consequence than depriving some bees f the fruits of their labour. I’m struggling to link that computer with necessity of survival. So on one hand you are critical of honey users who see a benefit from using it but have no qualms about buying completely unecessary products such as your computer. Products that will always result in the death of an animal to provide you with a leasure item you enjoy. At least honey doesn’t require the destruction of the animal that created it.

  24. Ward February 5, 2011 at 10:42 am - Reply

    But wait a second… You haven’t gone vegan either. And animal was exploited and killed to make the plastic in the computer your wrote this blog on. It was exploited and killed to make the rubber in the soles of your shoes. To make the tires on your car/bus/bike you use to get around. And the list goes on…

    Aren’t you guilty of making the same kinds of excuses you are being critical of?

    And on a related subject why isn’t the vegan community dealing agressively with the rodents and other mammals poisoned annually for no greater crime than competing for the vegetables vegans want to eat? Al I’ve ever heard from vegans was a denial of culpability or silence.

    • KD February 5, 2011 at 12:04 pm - Reply

      Ward,

      The questions you raise have been addressed on another post I wrote called Candy Coated Veganism is giving me a bellyache
      Here is a snippet of that post:

      “For the animals, veganism is life or death. That’s it. Your choices in life either spares an animal or it doesn’t. That’s what veganism is about. Vegans make choices to minimize and eliminate, as much as possible (from educated earnest attempts), animal products from their lives. And before you start in on me, I am aware that I will never fully remove every animal product or by-product from my lifestyle. But my choices in consumption are done so with care and never without investigation. I read labels, I look up ingredients, I look up companies, I look up words I don’t know on labels- I do my best to be educated. Let’s solve the billions of animals consumed each year for food, then worry about the mice in the fields being killed during harvests. One death isn’t more meaningful over the other- they are both sad. But one is choice, the other is the unfortunate result of having to farm on larger and larger scales. It isn’t the same thing.”

  25. v3gan February 4, 2011 at 10:15 pm - Reply

    RT @YourDailyVegan: Did you miss it earlier? [New Post] A Vegan Misconception – https://www.yourdailyvegan.com/2011/02/03… #vegan

  26. jpaulcon February 4, 2011 at 6:09 am - Reply

    @YourDailyVegan I started eating a Vegan diet because of a book I read called”The China Study” I eat Vegan for my health.be happy

    • YourDailyVegan February 4, 2011 at 1:23 pm - Reply

      @jpaulcon That’s great! How long have you been vegan?

      • jpaulcon February 7, 2011 at 4:19 pm - Reply

        @YourDailyVegan Sory took so long . About three and a half years, and loven it.

  27. elygad February 4, 2011 at 4:16 am - Reply

    RT @YourDailyVegan: Did you miss it earlier? [New Post] A Vegan Misconception – https://www.yourdailyvegan.com/2011/02/03… #vegan

  28. Jeanie February 3, 2011 at 10:15 pm - Reply

    Re a previous comment: I go to a college that is almost social justice-oriented to a fault, but is remarkably un-vegetarian friendly. When students there aren’t against vegetarianism because they close-mindedly believe it too be too limiting and fussy, they are invariably against it because they believe it is inherently classist. This drives me bonkers because I know it’s untrue but I also know where the idea comes from. Vegetarianism has gained a lot of press lately because it’s become trend amongst the elite to go vegan or at least claim they have done so. Their expensive cars and mansions and $50,000 Hermes bags and regular dinners at gourmet vegan joints like Candle 79 and Pure Food & Wine (and whatever their LA equivalents are) aren’t anywhere near the realm of affordability for 99% of people in this country, and certainly not for those living on welfare. This is the sort of vegan lifestyle that is most prominent in the news today. It out-glamours and out-spends the voices of bloggers and cookbook writers who advocate veganism because it has the potential to be the *most economical and healthy way of living* with a bit of work at adapting this sort of lifestyle. People who voice concern about the affordability of veganism only see the $6/box frozen veggie burgers and the high prices, or lack of availability, of fresh produce in the supermarkets of low-income areas. They aren’t familiar with the bulk bins of dried grains and legumes, or the possibility of community gardens. No one speaks loudly enough about these possibilities for the message to reach those who are already woefully uneducated about basic nutrition to begin with, and who necessarily tend to put healthy eating pretty low on their pyramid of things to be concerned over. This doesn’t even begin to touch on the ways that the meat and dairy industries’ advertising machines target and exploit low-income demographics, which makes the push for these populations to see veganism as accessible endlessly more challenging.
    I don’t really know what the solution to this is. Eating simple whole foods-based vegan meals isn’t as interesting or status-symbol worthy as some creative gourmet concoction, and in order for something to gain press, it needs to have money and powerful spokespersons behind it. People with that sort of clout are typically unlikely to speak out for simplicity and frugality.

  29. draggingmedown February 4, 2011 at 2:46 am - Reply

    RT @YourDailyVegan: Did you miss it earlier? [New Post] A Vegan Misconception – https://www.yourdailyvegan.com/2011/02/03… #vegan

  30. veganbunnyhugs February 4, 2011 at 12:55 am - Reply

    RT @YourDailyVegan: Did you miss it earlier? [New Post] A Vegan Misconception – https://www.yourdailyvegan.com/2011/02/03… #vegan

  31. Topsy.com February 3, 2011 at 4:37 pm - Reply

    […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Your Daily Vegan, Marion Strubelmayer, Ryan Thiel, Zina Mercil, Chris Alfieri and others. Chris Alfieri said: RT @YourDailyVegan: [New Post] A Vegan Misconception – http://bit.ly/gRKSTq #vegan […]

  32. Laurence Burris February 3, 2011 at 4:08 pm - Reply

    I am a new vegan and find it interesting that in all the blogs, essays, books and other media I have researching in, I haven’t found, what I call ” The Government Block of Cheese” situation. Most poor people and now middle-class people are on public assitance and food stamps. What about them and veganizing them. They are normally the most health compromised and marginalized group in America. They’re not hip and Moby-like, or a film actress. I think that the Vegan Community should be more populist and less elitest. Maybe I’m not doing my research in the right place? Vegans should organize an outreach program. Maybe this would be a start of a Vegan revolution.

  33. agoldfisher February 3, 2011 at 9:07 pm - Reply

    I don’t agree. Am willing to give peeps ben of doubt 4 trying to b veg RT @YourDailyVegan A Vegan Misconception https://www.yourdailyvegan.com/2011/02/03… #vegan

    • YourDailyVegan February 3, 2011 at 9:12 pm - Reply

      @agoldfisher I don’t think I understand what giving the benefit of the doubt as it relates, can you explain further?

      • agoldfisher February 3, 2011 at 9:31 pm - Reply

        @YourDailyVegan maybe not the best choice words in 140 chars.

        • YourDailyVegan February 3, 2011 at 9:32 pm - Reply

          @agoldfisher Okay…though I would really like to hear your thoughts. Let me know if you want to discuss further, I’m game :)

          • agoldfisher February 3, 2011 at 9:39 pm - Reply

            @YourDailyVegan As u say in ur blog https://www.yourdailyvegan.com/2011/02/03… #vegan isn’t about being perfect. I’m not. Honey is hard 4 many nonvegans to grasp

            • YourDailyVegan February 3, 2011 at 9:41 pm - Reply

              @agoldfisher I agree with a lot of your points, but just because it isn’t easy to grasp doesn’t mean it’s not vegan (1 of 2)

            • YourDailyVegan February 3, 2011 at 9:43 pm - Reply

              @agoldfisher we really need a consistent message, a unified front. Until then, we remain in chaos and confusion.

      • agoldfisher February 3, 2011 at 9:33 pm - Reply

        @YourDailyVegan I don’t eat honey, but if someone else does, i don’t take it as an excuse (bene of the doubt) just they need some education

  34. ryanthiel February 3, 2011 at 9:06 pm - Reply

    RT @YourDailyVegan: [New Post] A Vegan Misconception – https://www.yourdailyvegan.com/2011/02/03… #vegan

  35. zinadivayoga February 3, 2011 at 9:02 pm - Reply

    RT @YourDailyVegan: [New Post] A Vegan Misconception – https://www.yourdailyvegan.com/2011/02/03… #vegan

  36. ChrisOvFear February 3, 2011 at 9:00 pm - Reply

    RT @YourDailyVegan: [New Post] A Vegan Misconception – https://www.yourdailyvegan.com/2011/02/03… #vegan